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01303 840 117

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RICHARD’S Tips

Browse through any of the tips below, straight from Gate Safe founder, Richard Jackson
  • Maintenance Matters…
    RICHARD’S TOP TIPS
    MAINTENANCE MATTERS ….

    Regular maintenance is critical to ensure a safe and compliant automated gate. Most gates should be maintained a minimum of every six months (more frequently for gates which are exposed to exceptionally heavy usage) by a Gate Safe Aware installer who has undergone the requisite specialist training to demonstrate the necessary skills and knowledge to appreciate the requirements of a safe automated gate installation.

    Just as you need to keep an eye on how a car is running in between formal services, anyone who has responsibility for an automated gate must be prepared to review the condition of the gate on a regular basis, outside of the biannual services.

    Here is a simple checklist detailing the important factors influencing the safety of an automated gate – we recommend that these checks should be made formally on a monthly basis. However, we would also encourage anyone that uses the gate to keep an eye out for any signs of damage / excessive wear and tear.

    • Are the photocells clean and clear of any debris which could hinder their ability to track a moving object? Excessive plant growth, litter, leaves, even snow can seriously compromise the efficiency of a photocell?
    • Are the photocells operating correctly on an opening and closing cycle?
    • Are the hinges of the gate able to move with ease? Consider whether there is a need to lubricate the hinges or any other moving parts / does the gate move freely when operating?
    • Are there any visible signs of wear and tear? This would include any deterioration in the rubber that features on the safety pressure edges or hinge protectors?
    • Is the control box still intact? No loose wires? No obvious signs of any ingress of dust / water?
    • Is the warning sign on the gate still legible? If fitted, is the warning light / audible signal in working order?
    • Are you able to release the gate manually? Is the manual release key easy to access?

    If you are unsure of any of the above requirements, please contact your nearest Gate Safe Aware installer, find them HERE
  • Check those safety edges…
    RICHARD’S TOP TIPS
    Check those safety edges

    Gate Safe has received information claiming that in certain circumstances the effectiveness of safety edges can be compromised as a result of a fault between the safety edge controller and the gate controller, resulting in the loss of the safety function.

    Let’s keep it simple, all edges should be checked weekly to ensure that they are working. There is no need for a weekly engineer visit, simply position something in front of the various edges when the gate is operating and make sure that the gate stops and backs off when it comes into contact with the object.

    Taking the time out do this on a weekly basis will ensure you have a safe gate!
  • Power outage? Problem sorted…
    RICHARD’S TOP TIPS
    Power outage? Problem sorted!

    Here’s a simple yet highly effective response to dealing with the frustrating (and possibly dangerous) problem associated with manually releasing an automatic gate in the event of a power cut.

    Rather than waste precious time trying to find the manual release keys / key holder, why not supply a neat key safe which contains the keys with every gate sold? The safe can be installed on the post or adjacent to the post and all gate users should be notified of the safe code. That way they will have instant access to the release key if the power fails.
  • Mind the gap…
    RICHARD’S TOP TIPS
    Mind the gap!

    Salford City Council has been fined £20,000 after a six-year-old boy with autism and learning difficulties lost the tips of three fingers when his hand became trapped in a school gate in 2012. The incident occurred because there had been a failure to fit a guard over the gate hinges, despite the fact that the risk assessment on the gate had revealed that staff needed to be vigilant and supervise children through the gates. The gap in question reduced from 8mm to nothing … Gate Safe speculates that there are many other gates in operation within a school environment that also feature gaps that reduce enough to represent a significant risk. So our advice to everyone is check those gaps!

    However, the blame cannot simply be placed on the school. I did a survey at another school last week and identified an automatic gate that was decidedly unsafe. The school was under the impression that they had been supplied a “new” gate but in reality it was second hand! It would seem that purchasers not only need to spell out that they want a CE marked gate, they also want a newly manufactured one!

    Regular maintenance is critical to ensure a safe and compliant automated gate. Most gates should be maintained a minimum of every six months (more frequently for gates which are exposed to exceptionally heavy usage) by a Gate Safe Aware installer who has undergone the requisite specialist training to demonstrate the necessary skills and knowledge to appreciate the requirements of a safe automated gate installation.
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Address:
Gate Safe
Beverlea, Clavertye,
Elham, Canterbury
Kent. CT4 6YE

t: 01303 840 117

Gate Safe is a registered charity in England and Wales (no 1149261). Gate Safe and the Gate Safe logo are registered trade marks of GSSC Ltd.

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